Kindergarten Unit Plan

Louisiana - Then and Now Kindergarten Grade Unit

Name of Project:  Louisiana – Then and Now   

Duration:  April 23 - May 18

Subject/Content:  ELA/Math/Science/Social Studies

Grade Level:  K

Overall Driving Question:  How has Louisiana changed over the last 200 years?  Let's look at Louisiana - Then and Now!

Cluster Guiding Question:  Family Life – How has family life changed over the last 200 years? (K-1)

CCSS (Common Core State Standards):

ELA
Reading Standards for Literature

Key Ideas and Details

1.  With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2.  With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
3.  With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7.  With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).

Reading Standards for Informational Text
Key Ideas and Details
1.  With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
2.  With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details.
3.  With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
7.  With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts).

Reading Standards: Foundational Skills (K-5)
Print Concepts
1.  Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.
     a. Follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page.
     b. Recognize that spoken words are represented in written language by specific sequences of letters.
     c. Understand that words are separated by spaces in print.
     d. Recognize and name all upper- and lowercase letters of the alphabet.

Phonics and Word Recognition
3.  Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.
     c.  Read common high-frequency words by sight (e.g., the, of, to, you, she, my, is, are, do, does).

Fluency
4.  Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.

Writing Standards K-5
Text Types and Purposes
2.  Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
3.  Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened.

Production and Distribution of Writing
6.  With guidance and support from adults, explore a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing, including in collaboration with peers.

Speaking and Listening Standards K-5
Comprehension and Collaboration
1.  Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
     a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
2.  Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood.

Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas
4.  Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
5.  Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.
6.  Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.

Language Standards K-5
Conventions of Standard English
1.  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
     a.  Print many upper- and lowercase letters.
     b.  Use frequently occurring nouns and verbs.
2.  Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
     a.  Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.
     b.  Recognize and name end punctuation.
     d.  Spell simple words phonetically, drawing on knowledge of sound-letter relationships.

Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
6.  Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Math

Counting and Cardinality K.CC
Know number names and the count sequence.
1.  Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
2.  Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).
3.  Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).

Count to tell the number of objects.
4.  Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
     a.  When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.
     b.  Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.
     c.   Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.
5.  Count to answer "how many?" questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1-20, count out that many objects.

Compare numbers.
6.  Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies.

Number and Operations in Base Ten  K.NBT
Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place value.
1.  Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

Measurement and Data  K.MD
Describe and compare measurable attributes.
1.  Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.
2.  Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of"/"less of" the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.

Geometry  K.G
Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.
5.  Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.

Science and Social Studies is taught using informational text in the CCSS.

Major Products & Performances

Competition:  "Tell us About the Past - Win the Present!"

Class Competition Guidelines  Printer Friendly Version 

Competition Rubric  Printer Friendly Rubric

Each teacher will assist his/her class in submitting a class Presentation of Learning (POL) display that has been developed by the students of his/her class.  The displays will be featured during the School Showcase to take place May 14th – May 17th.  The class POL display may include but is not limited to:  tri-fold display board designed by the class with pictures to illustrate their work on the project; displays of individual and group products produced during the project; digital artifacts and/or products produced during the project, etc.  The class POLs will be judged at the school level and a school winner will be chosen in each cluster (K-1, 2-3, 4-6). Each class that is a school winner will be featured in the district Virtual Showcase.  The school winners will compete in a district contest and the winners of this contest will receive a set of five iPods as a reward.  

 School Competitions         

  • Each school will be responsible to host a Louisiana:  Then and Now Showcase (May 14-17).
  • A judging committee of the principal’s choice will be established.  (Suggestions include:  school librarian, assistant principal, guidance counselor, curriculum coordinator, instructional practitioners, retired teachers, etc.)
  • Rubrics will be provided to classes in advance so they will understand what characteristics will be judged.
  • School contest winners must be decided by Thursday, May 17th. 
  • There will be a school winner for each cluster (K-1; 2-3; 4-6).
  • Each class that is a school winner will be featured in the district Virtual Showcase.
  • Each class that is a school winner will participate in the district contest.

District Competitions

  • The judging will take place during the ELT assigned school visit on May 21 - 22.    The classes will present their projects to the judging committee comprised of ELT members.
  • Each class will have 5 minutes to showcase their projects to the judges.
  • Judges will ask questions after the presentation is completed.
  • Judges will score rubrics individually.  ISS/IT will tabulate the rubrics.  District winners will be featured at the June School Board meeting.
 Group/Class Products/Performances
  1. The students will work with a partner to create a pictograph of their families. 
  2. The students will work with a group to create a number book.
  3. The students make a map showing where their grandparents were born.
  4. The students will make a class recipe book with illustrations.
  5. The students will make a class picture book of activities families may have done 200 years ago.
  6. The students will create a class pictograph showing the number of pets the students have.
  7. The students will design a house for a pet, using two-or three-dimensional objects.
  8. The students will create a model of a Louisiana habitat using a box.
  9. The students will make a collage using an outline map of Louisiana using animal pictures.

Individual Products/Performances 

  1. The students will each create a family tree.
  2. The students will write a story and illustrate about their family.
  3. The students will complete a Connect the Dot activity sheet.
  4. The students will create a greater than, less than page using a given number using LA symbols.
  5. The students will create a picture of family or themselves using fingerprints and/or thumbprints.
  6. The students will draw a picture of the favorite place they have visited with their family. 
  7. The students will draw a picture of how families traveled then and now.
  8. The students will draw a picture of activities that families may have done 200 years ago.
  9. The students will write and illustrate a story about something they like to do with their family.   
  10. The students will outline map of LA with non-standard units of measure.
  11. The students will measure their foot cut out using non-standard units of measure. 
  12. The students will create a meal by drawing/pasting foods on a paper plate.
  13. The students will make maracas to shake while listening to Louisiana music. 
  14. The students will construct a po'boy sandwich using construction paper.
  15. The students will draw a picture of their favorite family celebration. The students will create and illustrate a story for a given number using animals found in Louisiana.
  16. The student will write and illustrate a story about a pet.
  17. The students will create an animal for their habitat using modeling clay.
  18. The students will draw a picture of an animal in its habitat.
  19. The students will draw and/or describe a trip where they could see Louisiana animals. 

NOTE:  Although not specifically written into the Unit Plan, web tools such as Storybird, StoryJumper, Tux Paint, Drawing for Children, KerPoof, Little Bird Tales are ideal mediums for Kindergarten and First Grade Students to use for drawing and writing.  We encourage the use of these tools throughout the project.

Event:  Overview of Louisiana Bicentennial (1 or 2 day)

Louisiana Bicentennial Website
http://www.louisianabicentennial2012.com/
 
Louisiana Bicentennial Desk Reference
http://www.louisianabicentennial2012.com/userfiles/file/resources/DeskReference.pdf
This is a pdf file that everyone should download/save to their computer’s desktop, as it will be used throughout the project-based learning unit.  By saving it on the desktop, it will be convenient for future reference and use.

Calendar of Activities

Week One

Notes: The first week will begin with the entry event on the Louisiana Bicentennial.  Following this, activities will focus on helping students gain mastery of reading, speaking and listening skills, writing, and math skills.  Week One will focus on family - then and now.  Me and My Family Tree by Joan Sweeney will be used in the first week of the unit.  One copy of the book has been purchased and is located in each school library for use by Kindergarten and First Grade.  The book will need to be shared.  There are also copies for checkout at the Ouachita Parish Public Library.
 
The teacher will complete the Final Summative Assessment Checklist for each student as he/she completes each activity.

Procedures for Week One - Family

ALL Subjects
Inform students that they will be learning about the 200th Anniversary of Louisiana Statehood (Louisiana's 200th Birthday!) through a unit entitled Louisiana - Then and Now. The teacher will use the Smart Notebook Lesson K-1 Intro LA Bicentennial

ELA

  1. On SMART Board, brainstorm family member vocabulary. This should include all possible family members that students have. (The vocabulary should be reviewed each day.)
  2. Watch LPB Video, such as What is a Family? (What Is a Family?, Prod. 100% Educational Videos. 100% Educational Videos, 1997. Discovery Education. Web. 19 March 2012.
  3. Teacher reads aloud the story, Me and My Family Tree, by Joan Sweeney. The teacher will ask questions about the story. Teacher will question students about characters, illustrations, setting and events in the story. Students will answer.
  4. The teacher will review the Family Tree assessment rubric with the students.
  5. The students will make their own family tree. The students will work with a partner or small group, assisting each other. They will draw a tree with a trunk. They will then tear strips of green and brown construction paper to glue on their family tree. They will be given circles on which to draw their family members and cut out. They will glue the circles on the tree and label their family members. The students will present and discuss their family tree with the class. For grading purposes, the Family Tree activity will be scored with the Family Tree Assessment.  An example of the finished product is provided.
    The students will read In The Tub and/or Tim Will Go in the On Level Readers for Storytown Reading Series. The teacher will assist with vocabulary as needed. The teacher will ask questions about the story. Teacher will question students about the characters, illustrations, setting and events in the story. Students will answer.
  6. The student will write a story about their family and illustrate. They will share with the class when completed. For grading purposes, the teacher will use the assessment rubric.

NOTE: The teacher will ask the students to bring a recipe in their own words from home for the following week's activities.

Math

  1. The teacher will explain that Louisiana is 200 years old and we are going to be counting to 100, which is half of 200.  The teacher will use the hundred boards in SMART Notebook as the students count to 100 by ones and tens.  The teacher will pick a random number and have the students begin counting forward from that number. 
  2. The teacher will show the Connect the Dot Notebook Activity.  The teacher will use dual page view to show the hundreds board as well.  (The teacher will have printed the dot to dot picture that is in the attachments.)  Each student will have a copy.  The teacher will call on students to complete the picture on the SMART Board, while students are completing their own copy at their desk.  The students will color their map.  (The completed connect the dot picture may be used as formative assessment.)  Connect the Dot Activity Sheet
  3. The teacher shows a number of objects (up to 19) on the SMART board or document camera.  (The teacher will use tens and ones manipulatives.)  The students will count aloud by tens and ones, and write the numeral on a piece of paper.  Pictures of family members should be used as the manipulatives.  Manipulatives.
  4. The students will create a greater than, less than activity using Louisiana symbols.  The teacher will demonstrate less than and greater than on the SMART Board.  The teacher will give each child a piece of ditto paper.  It will be folded in half like a hamburger. Then the paper will be turned sideways.  Each child will be assigned a number (to ten).  The student will write their number on the fold.  A State Symbols sheet will be printed out and given to each student. On the left side of the paper the student will show less than their number by pasting state symbols on their paper and writing the number.  On the right side of the paper, the student will show greater than their number by pasting the state symbols on the paper and writing the number.  The students will show and describe their numbers to the class. This activity will be used as a formative assessment using the Number Rubric.
  5. The teacher will show a pictograph of her family members (stick figures) on the SMART Board using Pictograph Form.  The students will work with a partner to create one pictograph of members of both students' families using the Stick Figure Pictograph Word Document.  The students will draw their family members.  The pairs will share their pictograph with the class.  This can be formative assessment using the Family Picture Rubric.
  6. The teacher will have the students count from 0 to 20.  The teacher will explain that they are going to make number books.  The teacher will divide the class into groups.  Each group will make a number book of the numbers 0 to 20 using the state symbols.  One number will be on each page of a paper that has been folded like a hamburger.  Each student will do 4 consecutive numbers.  The teacher will staple the books after completion. This may be used as a formative assessment.  Number Book Team Member Rubric.

Science

  1. The teacher will show the LPB CyberChannel video:  Your Genes: Why You Look the Way You Do. Prod. Colman Communications. Colman Communications, 1994. Discovery Education. Web. 20 March 2012. .
  2. The teacher will have the students discuss traits that they get from their parents or grandparents.
  3. The teacher will discuss inherited traits (earlobe attachment, tongue rolling, cleft chin, dimples, handedness, eye color, hair color, hair type), using page 3 of the pdf document at the following web address as a guide:  http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/traits/activities/pdfs/Inherited%20Human%20Traits%20Quick%20Reference_Public.pdf.  Another resource is page 2 of the following pdf document:  http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/traits/activities/pdfs/Traits%20Trivia_Public.pdf.  A resource with activities is http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/begin/traits/activities/.
  4. The teacher will show the LPB CyberChannel video:  How We're Different and Alike. Prod. Colman Communications. Colman Communications, 1994. Discovery Education. Web. 20 March 2012. .
  5. The teacher will explain to students that everyone's fingerprints are different.  The students will create their family using fingerprints (little finger for baby, thumb for daddy, etc.) and/or use their thumbprint to create picture of themselves.  The teacher will use an ink pad (s) for the students to stamp their fingerprints. 
  6. The students will work in groups to compare their thumbprints. 
  7. The students will share their pictures with the class.  Fingerprint Family Assessment

Social Studies 

  1. The teacher will ask the students to find where their grandparents and parents were born. (This will be used for tomorrow's activity.) 
  2. The teacher will show LPB CyberChannel Video:  Small Farms. Prod. 100% Educational Videos. 100% Educational Videos, 2002. Discovery Education. Web. 19 March 2012. .  The teacher will relate the video to then and now regarding family life.  200 years ago, many families lived on farms.  (Iowa is part of the Louisiana Purchase,). The teacher will ask how family life is different now compared with the family in the video. The teacher will ask the students questions about the video. 
  3. The students will ask their parents where their grandparents where they were born.  The students will use this information to create a class map showing where the grandparents were born.  The teacher will use the K-1 Grandparent Map Activity on the SMART Board.  The students will come to the SMART Board and (with guidance from the teacher) make a dot on the approximate place where their grandparents was born.    (Use http://maps.google.com/ to find small towns.)  The teacher will save the Notebook or print it for the showcase.
  4. After the map is completed, the teacher will lead a discussion about which state most of them come from, which state has the least, etc. 
  5. The teacher will brainstorm with the students, places they have been with their family. 
  6. The students will draw a picture of the favorite place they have visited with their family. 
  7. After completion of the pictures, the students will hold their picture and tell the story to the class.  Each school has access to a Flip Video camera and a set of iPods which the teacher can use to make a recording and submit for the Virtual Showcase. These resources are housed in the library for teacher use. Favorite Place Story Assessment
  8. The teacher will brainstorm with the students the way they get to their favorite place (car, train, bus, plane).  Then the teacher will ask the students to think about how people got from place to place 200 years ago (wagon, walking, horseback, train).  The student will draw a picture of how families traveled then and now.  (This can be done on a folded piece of paper.  They can draw then on one half, and now on the other half.) Families Travel Story Assessment

Week Two

Notes: Following this, activities will focus on helping students gain mastery of reading, speaking and listening skills, writing, and math skills.  Week Two will focus on family activities - then and now.  Chef Creole and Today is Monday in Louisiana by Johnette Downing will be used in this week of the unit.  One copy of each book has been purchased and is located in each school library for use by Kindergarten and First Grade.  The books will need to be shared.  There are also copies for checkout at the Ouachita Parish Public Library.

Procedures for Week Two - Family Activities


All Subjects

April 30 - Happy Birthday, Louisiana!! Activity - Any of these activities can be used as assessment.

ELA

  1. The students will brainstorm family activities vocabulary in a SMART Notebook.  The teacher will write the words.  (The vocabulary should be reviewed each day,)
  2. The teacher will read Chef Creole by Johnette Downing. (One copy of this book is available in each school's library and will be shared among the K and 1st grade classes.) The teacher will ask questions about the story.  Teacher will question students about characters, illustrations, setting and events in the story.  Students will answer.
  3. The teacher and students will sing the song (book) to the tune of "The Bear Went Over the Mountain" or use the video (Chef Creole) to sing the song.
  4. The teacher will have asked the students to bring a recipe in their own words for this week's activities.  The student will tell the recipe to the teacher and the teacher will write the recipe.  The student will draw a picture of the recipe.  The recipes and drawings will be compiled in a class Recipe Book.
  5. The teacher will show the LPB CyberChannel Video:   All About Families. Prod. Colman Communications. Colman Communications, 1999. Discovery Education. Web. 20 March 2012. .  The teacher will discuss activities the families on the video did.  The teacher will ask the students to tell some of the activities they do with their family.  The teacher will show the K-1 Family Picture Activity of the family in the 1800s.  The teacher will lead the discussion to things families did 200 years ago.  The teacher will help the students generate ideas of things children did 200 years ago.  The teacher will ask the students to draw a picture of activities that families may have done 200 years ago.  The teacher will compile the pictures into a book. 
  6. The students will write a story about something they like to do with their family.  They will illustrate the story.  The students will read/retell their stories when completed.  Family Activity Assessment
  7. The students will read the story, Where Do I Go?, Where Will They Go? Or Pam and Hal from the On Level Readers in the Storytown Reading Series.  The teacher will assist with vocabulary as needed.  The teacher will ask questions about the story.  Teacher will question students about the characters, illustrations, setting and events in the story.  Students will answer.

Math

  1. The teacher will divide her class into partners.  The teacher will provide an outline map of Louisiana for students to measure perimeter of Louisiana using non-standard units of measure (such as paper clips, marshmallows,Teddy Grahams, beans, macaroni, etc.).  The students will glue their measuring tools around the perimeter of the state.  The students will record their measurements at the bottom of the map.  The students will glue their measuring instrument on the paper next to the measurement.   This may be used as a formative assessment using the Measure LA Assessment.
  2. The teacher will initiate a discussion about family pets.  The students will create a class pictograph using the number and kind of pets in their family using a SMART Notebook.  After creating the pictograph, the teacher will ask questions about the pictograph (such as how many more dogs that cats?), which column has the least number, which column has the most, etc.).  The teacher will save the SMART Notebook for the Showcase.
  3. The teacher will initiate a discussion about how people got from one place to another 200 years ago (walking, horseback or by wagon).  The teacher will lead the discussion to exercise and walking in Louisiana.  The teacher will guide the discussion toward feet.  The student will trace the outline of their foot twice on a sheet of paper and cut out and label with their name.  The teacher will collect one of the foot cut outs and put aside for a later activity.  The students will sort the foot cut out according to length.
  4. Working with a partner, the students will use the foot cut out to measure each other, things in the classroom, and then the perimeter of the room. 
  5. Working with a partner, the students will find an object in the classroom that is about the same length as their foot cut out.  The teacher will record on the SMART Board after the students have found the objects.  If time allows, they will find an object shorter than and longer than their foot cut out.
  6. The teacher will distribute the foot cut out that she collected previously.  Working with a partner, they will measure their own foot cut out using non-standard units of measure.  They will glue the cut out on sheet of paper and write the number that shows how long their foot is.  Foot Cut Out Assessment

Science

  1. The teacher will read Today Is Monday in Louisiana, by Johnette Downing as an introduction to Louisiana foods. 
  2. The teacher will conduct a brainstorming activity talking about food, then and now.  The teacher will ask such questions as:  Where did people in Louisiana get their food 200 years ago?, How do people get their food now?, Do we eat the same foods as they did 200 years ago?, etc.)
  3. The teacher will discuss My Plate for healthy eating with the students.  The teacher will use the Choose My Plate Website as a reference:  http://www.choosemyplate.gov/.  For an example picture of Choose My Plate, visit http://www.choosemyplate.gov/images/MyPlateImages/JPG/myplate_green.jpg.  For further information on getting started with My Plate, visit http://www.choosemyplate.gov/print-materials-ordering/getting-started.html
  4. The teacher will show the LPB CyberChannel video: MyPlate: Dietary Guidelines for Elementary Students, (MyPlate: Dietary Guidelines for Elementary Students.  Prod. Learning Zone Express.  Learning Zone Express, 2012. Discovery Education. Web. 20 April 2012. http://www.discoveryeducation.com/.)  
  5. The teacher will discuss with the students the importance of eating healthy foods.  The teacher may want to have the students view the Schooltube video about healthy eating http://www.schooltube.com/video/fd71e0cc87224be4ae04/Garrett%20Healthy%20Eating%20Rhyme
  6. The students will use construction paper as their placemat, a paper plate, and pictures of foods they like to eat by drawing pictures; cutting pictures from magazines, catalogs, sale papers, etc.; or printing pictures from the internet. The student should keep in mind the healthy eating habits that they saw while on the My Plate website.  Students will display and discuss their food choices with the class. My Plate Assessment
  7. The teacher will brainstorm with the students foods grown in Louisiana, such as okra, rice, sweet potatoes, corn, peas, tomatoes, peaches, strawberries, blueberries, peppers, etc.  The teacher will then show the matching activity on the SMART Board which shows foods grown in Louisiana and foods not grown in Louisiana.  The students will drag the pictures of things that grow in Louisiana to the picture of the Louisiana map.
  8. The students will fill an empty water or soda bottle with the Louisiana food, rice, (or something similar) to make maracas.  The teacher will play some Louisiana music and the students will shake the maracas in time to the music. 
  9. The teacher will lead a discussion of the history of foods, such as okra, http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/publications/vegetabletravelers/okra.html.  Another food that can be discussed is the poboy, http://www.poboyfest.com/history.
  10. The students will construct a PoBoy from construction paper.  (Similar to the picture in the book: Today is Monday in Louisiana.)  PoBoy Checklist

Social Studies

  1. The teacher will use the KWL chart on the SMART Board to determine what Louisiana symbols the students know and want to know (K column and W column).
  2. Then the teacher will show the SchoolTube video: "Give me Louisiana", Kinder Elementary School: http://www.schooltube.com/video/b76219ef08b046e5ab65/Give%20Me%20Louisiana.   (6 minutes)
  3. The teacher will refer back to the KWL chart.  The teacher will show that the L column is blank.  The teacher will assist the students in completing the L column of the KWL chart on the SMART Board.
  4. The teacher will show the LPB CyberChannel video:   (Cultural Celebrations from around the World. Prod. 100% Educational Videos. 100% Educational Videos, 2005. Discovery Education. Web. 21 March 2012. . (3 minutes)  The teacher will initiate a discussion about occasions students celebrate with their family.  The students will draw a picture of their favorite family celebration.   My Family Celebrations Story Assessment
  5. The teacher will divide the students into groups.  The students can use props, costumes, drawings, etc. to act out a family celebration. 

Week Three

Notes:  Following this, activities will focus on helping students gain mastery of reading, speaking and listening skills, writing, and math skills.  Week Three will focus on Louisiana Animals - then and now. 

Procedures for Week Three
ELA

  1. The teacher will brainstorm animals that live in Louisiana with the students. Animal names will be used for vocabulary. 
  2. The teacher will read aloud Young Flash the Deer, by Thornton W. Burgess (http://www.childrensbooksonline.org/Young_Flash_the_Deer/pages/01_Young_Flash_the_Deer.htm).  The teacher will ask questions about the story.  Teacher will question students about the characters, illustrations, setting and events in the story.  Students will answer.
  3. The teacher will lead a discussion about the animals in "Young Flash the Deer", calling attention to animals that would live in the wild.  Then lead the discussion to animals in the story that might be a pet (rabbit).  The teacher will assist the students in brainstorming animals that can be pets.  The teacher will ask the students if they think that people had the same pets 200 years. A resource for the teacher to use is:  http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/453505/pet.    
  4. The students will write and illustrate a story about a pet (If they have no pet, they can pretend they have a pet). 
  5. The students will read/retell their story to the class. Pet Story Assessment
  6. The student will read We Want a Pet, On Level Readers in the Storytown Reading Series.  The teacher will ask questions about the story.  Teacher will question students about the characters, illustrations, setting and events in the story.  The students will answer.  
  7. The teacher will show the LPB CyberChannel video, Reading Rainbow: Martha Speaks. Prod. Smarterville. Smarterville, 1995. Discovery Education. Web. 22 March 2012. .
  8. The teacher will divide students into groups.  The students will pretend they are an animal in "Young Flash the Deer".  Ask them to tell the other students in the group what that animal might say if it could talk.  Each student should get a turn. 

Math

  1. The teacher will show the story, Young Flash the Deer.  The teacher will help the student count the number of Louisiana animals in the story. 
  2. The teacher will use the document camera and manipulatives (unifix cubes) to count the animals as they read the story. 
  3. The teacher will ask the students if any of these animals can be pets. The teacher will ask the students to tell why or why not. 
  4. The teacher will show the LPB CyberChannel video:  My Best Friend.  Prod. Smarterville.  Smarterville, 1991. Discovery Education. Web. 2 April 2012. . The teacher will show the bar graph on the SMART Board.  The students will take turns marking the pet(s) they have at home on the bar graph.  The students will then take turns telling about their pet. 
  5. The student will work with a partner in this activity.  The students will use two-dimensional and/or three-dimensional shapes to design a house for a pet, such as a dog or cat.  If possible the teacher will take pictures of the houses or the student may draw a representation of the house.  The students will share their designs with the class.  Pet House Project Checklist
  6. The teacher will divide the class into pairs.  The teacher will assign a number to each set of students.  The students will create a story for the assigned number.  The students will illustrate their stories using animals found in Louisiana.  The students will share their stories with the class.  Number Story Assessment
  7. An additional resource to use is the IXL website: http://www.ixl.com/.  This website is divided into activities by grade level.  

Science

  1. The teacher will show the LPB CyberChannel video: Habitats: Homes for Living Things. Prod. 100% Educational Videos. 100% Educational Videos, 2000. Discovery Education. Web. 20 March 2012. http://www.discoveryeducation.com/.  (Segments: Introduction, Forest Habitat, Pond Habitat)  The teacher will use a chart to determine what animals from the video live in Louisiana and which do not.
  2. The teacher will brainstorm with the students a list of other Louisiana animals using SMART Notebook. 
  3. The teacher will lead a discussion about habitats of animals found in Louisiana using the brainstorming list.  The teacher will call attention to the fact that animals need a place to live, food and water.  The teacher and students will discuss where the animals live. 
  4. The students will work in groups to create a model of a Louisiana habitat using a shoebox, a cereal box or other similar box. 
  5. The student will work in groups to build Louisiana animal/animals for their habitat out of modeling clay. 
  6. The students will present their habitat and animal/animals to the class.  LA Habitat Checklist
  7. The student will draw a picture of an animal in its habitat.  The student can tell about his picture.  Each school has access to a Flip Video camera and a set of iPods which the teacher can use to make a recording and submit for the Virtual Showcase. These resources are housed in the library for teacher use. Drawing Checklist

Social Studies

  1. The teacher will discuss bald eagles, the national bird, which lives in Louisiana.  The teacher will view an Eagle webcam at one of these websites:
    http://www.wvec.com/eaglecam
    http://outdoorchannel.com/Conservation/EagleCam.aspx
  2. The teacher will point out that eagles live here.  The teacher will ask the students if we would see more eagles 200 years ago or now.  Ask the students to explain why. 
  3. The teacher will discuss the pelican, the state bird.  The teacher will show the news clip, http://current.com/1si0o4c, which shows pelicans being cleaned up after the Gulf oil spill.  The teacher will point out that 200 years ago, there would not have been an oil spill.  There was no oil drilling or a need for oil to run machines, cars, etc.   The teacher will ask the students if we would see more pelicans 200 years ago or now.  The students will explain why.
  4. The teacher will use SMART Notebook Eagle and Pelican Activity to show pictures of the eagle and pelican and complete a Venn diagram to help the students compare and contrast the two animals. The teacher will use these websites for informational purposes:  http://www.statesymbolsusa.org/Louisiana/bird_brown_pelican.html and http://www.statesymbolsusa.org/National_Symbols/Bird_bald_eagle.html.
  5. The teacher will have the students draw and/or describe a trip where they could see other Louisiana animals (for example: zoo, Black Bayou Lake Wildlife Refuge, lakes, etc.).  They will show their drawings to the class as they describe their trip.  LA Animals Drawing Assessment
  6. The teacher will take the students for a walk around the campus, looking for animals.  The students will make notes (drawings) of any animals they see.  After returning to the classroom, the teacher will facilitate a discussion about animals they saw, pointing out any animals that could have been seen, but weren't.  The teacher will show pictures of animals found in Louisiana Animals SMART Notebook.
  7. The student will work with a partner to make a collage using an outline map of Louisiana.  The student will fill in the map using animals that live in Louisiana by cutting pictures from magazines, newspapers, sale papers, or printed from the internet.  Students will share their collages with their classmates and display in the classroom. LA Map Collage Checklist

Week Four

Notes:  Week Four will be presentation week.  The presentation may be at the end of the week in order to finalize any projects that need to be finished.  Presentation will be finalized by the teachers at each school, but MUST include a presentation of learning (product showcase).  Suggestions are listed below. 

Procedures for Week Four

1. Louisiana - Then and Now Showcase
Have a large room divided into two halves (Louisiana-Then and Louisiana-Now). The student products created during the activities of this unit would be displayed in the proper area of the room.
2. Louisiana - 200 Years of History Timeline
In conjunction with all of the grades at the school, create one long timeline around the gym/multipurpose room/cafeteria that reflects the historical events and products created by all grades that participated in the Louisiana-Then and Now unit. Parents and community member can view the display while students tell about their products, show their podcasts, sing historical songs/battle songs, etc.

Assessments

Formative Assessments (During Unit)

Family Tree                       
Family Story                      
Connect the Dot Activity               
Stick Figure Pictograph                  
Finger and Thumb Print Pictures                 
Picture of Favorite Place Visited with Family                         
Pictures of how family travels then and now         
Write and illustrate a story of something they like to do with their family   
Measuring Perimeter of Outline Map of LA                           
Measure foot cutout using non-standard units of measure
Paper Plate with Food Choices
Paper Po'Boy     
Picture of a family celebration    
Write and illustrate a story about a pet
Design a House for a Pet
Write a story for a given number that is illustrated with animals from LA
Animal Habitat and model of animal
Draw picture of an animal in its habitat and tell about it while teacher video-taped
Draw or describe a trip where they could see LA animals    

Summative Assessments (End of Unit)

Final Summative Assessment Checklist

Resources

Equipment:  
iPods - One set per school
Flip Videos - One per school
Computers/Laptops

Materials:
Templates/diagrams/assessments as noted in unit plan
Paper
Colors/colored pencils
Ink pad
Paper plates
Modeling clay
Boxes
Materials for measuring: rice, beans, teddy grahams, marshmallows, etc.
Materials for collages: old magazines, newspapers, etc. to cut out animal pictures
Glue/Glue Sticks

Field Trips

Below is a linked list of possible field trips.  The list includes historical attractions in North and Central Louisiana.   These field trips could be a virtual tour or real world field trips.  Please remember when taking students on a field trip that the purpose of the tour or trip is "Louisiana:  Then and Now."  Plan the trip so that students will be able to interview or hear from officials the history of the attraction.  Please video the children while they are interviewing or talking to the officials.  Assigning them questions and letting them work in groups may facilitate a better interview.   It might be possible to check out the iPods from the school so the students could take pictures or videos. 

Upon returning from your field trip have students write a paragraph or an essay about the trip particularly in reference to what they have learned about "Louisiana:  Then and Now."  Or you may choose to assign them drawings or models to help illustrate what they have learned.  You may want to ask each group to make a presentation to the class about what they have learned.  Allow them to be creative with their presentation.  If possible let them use technology such as the iPods, digital cameras, etc. to help them with their presentation.  Students may be able to use Animoto, Voki, or other Web 2.0 websites to help them prepare their presentations.  When the students make their presentations have other students video the presentations.  Please remember to submit all videos and digital photo albums to the Virtual Showcase so they can be posted online.

Field Trip List

The teacher should review the list of trips and decide which trips would be best suited for the appropriate grade level theme.

Additional Resources:
LPB CyberChannel Video:  Louisiana Purchase.  Prod. 100% Educational Videos.  100% Educational Videos, 2001. Discovery Education. Web. 19 March 2012. .

LPB CyberChannel Video:  Book Reviews: The Kids' Family Tree Book, What a Family!, and Seven Brave Women.  Prod. Smarterville.  Smarterville, 2006. Discovery Education. Web. 19 March 2012. .

LPB CyberChannel Video:  Reading Rainbow: Dinosaur Bob and His Adventures with the Family Lazardo.  Prod. Smarterville. 1989. Discovery Education. Web. 19 March 2012. .

LPB CyberChannel Video:  Diversity Elementary: Families.  Prod. Entertaining Diversity.  Entertaining Diversity, 2001. Discovery Education. Web. 19 March 2012. 

LA Picture Perfect - Vermilion Parish Schools - http://www.vrml.k12.la.us/Picture_Perfect/Default.html

Celebrating Louisiana's Birthday - Vermilion Parish Schools

East BatonRouge Parish Library
 

If links are broken, please email Nancy Hodges at nancy.hodges@mcschools.net.